Putin says Muslim refugees should go to Saudi Arabia or Iran “Where their radical beliefs are considered the norm”

This clip of Putin’s views on radicals is combined with footage of Fahad Qureshi, who leads a well-known Wahhabi organization “IslamNet”, out of Norway.
The Muslim world continues to be one of the least developed societies, where many Western values are considered offensive.
While every person has a right to their culture in their own land, one cannot choose to live in Europe and expect the society around them to live according to Sharia Law.
There are no borders in today’s internet age – these clerics can be accessed from any point in the globe. When Donald Trump says that we simply don’t know which Muslims subscribe to these views and which do not, he is correct.
But that doesn’t mean that all Muslims are Sunni, or that all Sunnis are Wahhabi [Salafi]. For example, the majority of Russia’s Chechens are Sunni Muslims, who live [almost] in harmony with the modern Russian state. Both of the Chechen wars were funded by Western dollars and influenced by Saudi clerics. Today, these influences remain – which is why it is common to find Chechens within ISIS ranks. At the same time, Chechnya has its own Muslim army against ISIS insurgents.
It is a constant balancing act between vastly varying interpretations of the Holy book, and modernity.
The US State Department is adamant on funding “the moderates” of the world but they have no idea how to tell them apart from the “extremists.” As a visionary, President Putin has been consciously building bridges to mitigate the two cultures in Russia for decades to come.
He has opened Europe’s largest Mosque in Moscow, has close ties with local Chechen leaders, and pumps millions into the Chechen economy to ensure that the people are educated and have as many opportunities as elsewhere in Russia.

At the same time, the people of Chechnya have traditions that are instilled only in that part of Russia. Most people who ask the right questions about their European identities, in their many different forms, are immediately branded as ‘nationalist’.
Most people who question the politics of mass migration are accused of far-right or fascist views. But isn’t there a danger of “European tolerance” creating a very unstable future for their own children? How will they reconcile their lives with second or third generation adherents of European Wahhabism? Except by this time, they will also be citizens of their hosting country, with full rights of voting and other civil liberties.
Source:www.guerrilla.news

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